Showing posts with label Bohemia. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Bohemia. Show all posts

Thursday, November 1, 2018

Cardinal Duka Recalls the Catholic Roots of the Czech Republic

Prague archbishop reproaches in pastoral letter, that the Church does not sufficiently recall the anniversary of the Republic

Prague (kath.net/KAP) Cardinal Dominik Duka commented on the 100th anniversary of the proclamation of the Czechoslovak Republic with a pastoral letter. The proclamation of the republic on October 28, 1918 had taken place at the foot of the St. Wenceslas Memorial in Prague's Wenceslas Square, and the Vatican was one of the first states to recognize the new state, Duka recalled.

The Pastoral Letter, dated 28 October, and published only on Duka's personal homepage, is signed by him only in his capacity as Archbishop of Prague and Primate of Bohemia, but not as President of the Czech Bishops' Conference, which only took place on the 23rd and held its 115th Assembly on 24 October.

First of all, Duka is reproachful that the Church does not sufficiently commemorate the anniversary of the republic. For, “together with a number of institutions and commissions, they were not only informed about the intended actions, but also shared information among themselves.” For the Catholic Church, "it was especially important to point out the roots of Czech statehood in connection with the worship of St. Wenceslas to the full extent of our early history and their continued existence until the founding of Czechoslovakia or Czech Republic.” This requirement was met in particular with the celebrations for Wenceslas Day (28 September).

The Primate Cardinal recalled the presence not only of Church  organizations, but also of the military and the Sokol ‘Movement at the solemn Mass in Stara Boleslav on the 28th of September. It was the members of this Christian-oriented movement who fought for the rebuilding of the sovereign republic during the First World War and during the Second World War. Thus, the continuity of the cult of Wenceslas was made visible during the celebrations.

Duka also mentioned the problem of founding the state 100 years ago. The festive atmosphere had been clouded by the not yet consolidated demarcation. But the federalization proclaimed by Kaiser Karl at the last moment "could not seal the fates of our peoples, but Karl's earnest efforts to conclude peace were undeniable.” He wanted to emphasize, “Charles’ renunciation of the throne of Bohemia, who had sworn allegiance to the dynasty, and were thus free to decide without inhibition,” said the cardinal.

The Primate cited in detail from the last pastoral letter of his predecessor Archbishop Paul Huyn (1868-1946) and from the first of his Vicar General Moric Picha (1869-1956) from the days of separation of 1918. Two days before the proclamation of the republic, on the 26th of October, the Archbishop of Prague described the war as a "just defensive war", which Catholics in particular must "do their utmost to be victorious.” It was the "last cause of hatred of the enemies" that "we were lucky enough to have a Catholic Emperor and a Catholic Empress." Huyn had then not returned from a visitation to Prague and officially resigned on September 19, 1919.

The Ecclesiastical Loyalty Promise of December 1918
On December 8, 1918, Vicar General Picha struck a new tone, Duka said. One sees "in the destinies of nations, and especially of our people, the hand of Divine Providence"; they wanted and will "wholeheartedly love our country in its new form, live in harmony and justice with all the citizens of our state and stand with due respect and sacrifice to the appointed government," Cardinal Duka quoted. He concluded his pastoral letter "with thanks for 100 years of honest work, bravery and courage, but also forgiveness where we failed.”

The former Czech Foreign Minister Karel Schwarzenberg, who spoke at a festive session of the Parliament as honorary president of the party TOP 09, also recalled emperor Karl. 1918 had allowed “a very civilized overthrow" and one must be "thankful to the Emperor Karl of blessed memory, that he had forbidden the use of force.”

In a TV interview in the news service CT24 also greeted Karl Habsburg, the current head of the House of Habsburg, and the historical role of his grandfather. The Emperor "in addition to his deep faith, also believed that, however bad the situation may be, one must endeavor to make the best out of it.” On this basis, one must "also consider the various peace efforts that emanated from him.” Karl came to power in a situation when - after the death of Emperor Franz Josef - the war was essentially beyond salvation."

Trans: Tancred vekron99@hotmail.com
AMDG

Thursday, August 11, 2016

Cardinal Duka Levels Criticism Against "Welcoming Polity" and Islamism and Was Censored by His Own Newspaper

Cardinal Dominink Duka was censored because of his criticisms
of Islamism and Mass Immigration by his own Catholic Newspaper
(Prague) Novinky , the most important Internet portal of the Czech Republic reported yesterday on an article by Cardinal Dominik Duka, Archbishop of Prague and Primate of Bohemia, he had written after the assassination of the French priest, Abbé Jacques Hamel. Abbé Hamel had his throat cut on July 26, while celebrating Holy Mass in the church Saint Etienne du Rouvray in Rouen. The priest was then beheaded. The two murderers were shot dead by police. The  Islamic State(IS) took credit for the act. Cardinal Duka sent his response to the renowned Catholic weekly Katolický Týdeník . This, however, refused to publish the article. The cardinal then published it on his Facebook page.
The Catholic cardinal had expressed himself critically in the past about Pope Francis' "welcoming culture". In his article, he warned of a "disproportionate and ruthless welcome policy". An expression which the Cardinal apparently was missed by the censorship of his own subordinates.
The caution and wisdom expressed by the Primate of Bohemia against Islamic immigrants sparked polemical attacks. The advocates of "welcoming culture" are well organized and deeply rooted, especially in the media, even in the Catholic media, as the Cardinal's  bitter experience demonstrated.
Cardinal Duka was bitterly attacked by  Msgr. Tomas Halik, one of the most famous Czech priests. The sociologist and philosopher of religion, who was ordained a priest in the 70s underground, became the General Secretary of the Czech Bishops' Conference and advisor to President Vaclav Havel in the 90s. Halik is Professor of Sociology at Charles University and rector of the University Church. He attacked his bishop: "The real allies of the Islamic State against the Western world are those who do not know the difference between Islam and jihadist terrorists."

Murder of Rouen: "All who have downplayed such acts, should now think"


Czech Catholic weekly Katolický Týdeník

Full disagrees Cardinal Duka. For him, the killing of Abbé Hamel was a "lesson" for all be those who previously downplayed similar incidents and downplayed the perpetrators as mentally ill and frustrated.  Furthermore, to remain silent "would be suicide for our society," said the Archbishop of Prague. He also called for more to pray for the victims of terrorism and to seek fewer excuses and apologies for terrorists.
The Cardinal ends with a reminder and an invitation: In Islam, says the primate,  there are hidden  violent tendencies, which is why those Muslims who do not share these tendencies, should react against if they wish have any share in credibility.
It is piquant to note that the weekly Katolický Týdeník, which imposed censorship on the cardinal for his critical attitude towards  mass immigration and the Islamization of Europe, belongs to the Czech Bishops' Conference.
In the time of the Czechoslovak Soviet Republic there had indeed been a Catholic journal, but one which had been controlled by the communist regime. It had the task to drive a wedge between Catholics, which is why it enjoyed little prestige among  these. After the collapse of the communist dictatorship, the new Catholic weekly was founded by a private publisher.
As Katolický Týdeník got into financial difficulties in the 90s, the paper was adopted, rescued and supported by the Czech Bishops' Conference. The journal is in fact the Church newspaper for the entire Czech Republic. Chief Editor Antonin Randa censored not only his own bishop but also his own publisher.  Cardinal Duka is namely, also, President of the Czech Bishops' Conference.
Text: Giuseppe Nardi
Picture: Youtube / Katolický Týdeník (screenshots)
Trans: Tancred vekron99@hotmail.com
Link to Katholisches...
AMDG

Thursday, December 17, 2015

Czech President: "Europe and Islam Are Not Compatible"

PRAGUE The Czech President Milos Zeman has spoken out against  Muslim immigration to Europe. "We respect the Islamic countries and their beliefs, as long as its inhabitants do not come to Europe. Because as soon as they come to Europe,  two cultures collide that are not compatible with each other," he said  in an interview with the state news agency TASR. Muslims have yet to have been assimilated in any European country. This proves the incompatibility of Islamic and European culture.
The EU Member States, urged Zeman, should rather invest more in securing the EU's external border than in the reception of refugees.
His country would have received no  asylum seekers,  had they not gone through secure countries before arriving in the Czech Republic. "To bring this stream of refugees under control, means not only to have  the police but also the army sent to the borders and in order to encourage the return of illegal immigrants. Precisely for this reason, because we are not the most secure country  for them," quoted the Austrian news agency APA Zeman as saying. (KRK)
AMDG

Wednesday, June 5, 2013

3 Billion in Reparations Paid to Church for Damages Caused by Communism

WARSAW, Poland – A Czech cardinal welcomed final court approval of government plans to pay billions of dollars to churches in compensation for their losses under communist rule.

On June 3, the Constitutional Court cleared the way for the implementation of a 2012 law that says 56 percent of assets, valued at $3.8 billion, will be returned to Catholic, Protestant, Orthodox and Jewish communities, with $3 billion paid out over a 30-year period as compensation for the rest of the properties. During that same period, annual government grants to churches will also be phased out.

“This ruling on the law for property settlements closes one of the infamous chapters in our history,” said Cardinal Dominik Duka of Prague. “Our society can congratulate itself (that) it has finally resolved this problem and remedied the damage done to churches under communism.”

Saturday, March 10, 2012

How Benedict XV Dealt With Czech Dissidents in 1919

About a hundred years ago there was a "Pastor's Initiative" of about 1200 priests against celibacy.  Rome reacted quickly and with great effectiveness.
The Main Church of the
Neo-Hussites in Prague


(kreuz.net)  Calls from clerics, who are disobedient to the hierarchy, is nothing new.

This was revealed by the Bavaria born Church historian, Cardinal Walter Brandmuller (83), in an article for the Catholic newspaer 'Tagespost'.

The Cardinal recalled a revolt of clerics which took place in Bohemia at the beginning of the twentieth century and spread to Slovakia.

Without Jews, without Rome, we'll build the German Cathedral.


Cardinal Brandmuller explained about how the turn of the nineteenth century there was a "Break Away from Rome Movement" present in Austria.

The initiator was Georg Ritter von Schönerer († 1921).

He used anti-clerical and antisemitic ideas: "Without Jews, without Rome, we'll build a German Cathedral home."

This was the genesis of the National Socialists.

After a decade the propaganda persuaded then around a hundred thousand Austrian Catholics.

This movement found a sequel a half-century later -- said Cardinal Brandmuller: "in the turbulent time after the Second Vatican Council by the adherents of "We Are Church", "Church From Below" and the circles around the "Kirchenvolkbegehren [Church People Seeking Reform].

The Demand Was Changed After the Council


A similar parallel to the Austrian one man show 'Pastor Initiative' is what Cardinal Brandmuller sees in the "Czech-Hussite National Church".  They existed in the years after the First World War.

Czech clerics revolted after the collapse of the Habsburg Monarchy firstly against the Episcopate.

After that they demanded a supposedly democratized and Rome-independent National Church.

The movement called itself 'Jednota'.  They wanted a Liturgy in the national language, a shortened Breviary and married priests.

Additionally they demanded to elect their own Bishops by the clergy and the people, a democratization of the Church constitution and the abolition of clerical clothing.

Rome Reacts

At the end of February 1919 the Viennese Nuncio Teodoro Valfre di Bonzo (+1922) traveled to Prague, in order to form a picture of the situation.

In June 1919 delegates of 'Jednota' were invited by the Pope to Rome.

In the mean time, the Nuncio informed the Vatican State Secretary, Pietro Cardinal Gasparri (+1934).

The Nuncio promoted  an unmistakable and decisive  position against 'Jednota'.

The rebels were not won over by concessions.  Giving away would have only further disturbed the faithful.

The 'Jednota' -- demands -- especially for married priests -- were decisively rejected.

The sending of a 'Jednota'-delegation to Rome led, according to Cardinal Brandmuller, to a division of  minds.

For example, the theological faculty of the University of Prague had distanced itself from its Dean, who had participated in the 'Jednota' delegation.

1,200 Want End to Priestly Celibacy

As the next development was completed, a radicalization of the group took place, said the Cardinal.  These named themselves from then on as 'Ohnisko' -- for burn point.

Their members were already decided even before the trip of 'Jednota'- Delegation to Rome,  were prepared to transact their demands in case of a Roman rejection.

In August 1919 'Ohnisko' called upon Catholic Priests to marry civilly.

As one of the first steps, fallen priest Bohumil Zahradnik acted.   In any case he was already living in concubinage for ten years.

The 'Ohnisko'- priests were addressed by the State authorities and compensated.

In September 1919 they attempted to get a dispensation for a very large number, 1,200 priests from celibacy.

The National Church was Proclaimed

On January 8th of 1920 the anti-clerical Czech government declared a "Czechoslovakian Church".

As Patriarch, the lapsed priest, a certain Karel Farsky (+1927) was elected.

This National Church represented Modernism.

A Catechism by Farksy maintained that Jesus was only a son of God in the same sense that all men were sons of God.

Christ is only the greatest of prophets.

For Cardinal Brandmuller it was thoroughly clear that the roots of the problem lay deeper than in the area of practical, disciplinary changes:

"A large part of the clergy were in a shattering crisis of their Catholic Faith."

Rome Came with a Heavy Hand


A week after the founding of the State Church -- on the 15th of January 1920-- the Holy See condemned the schismatic coalition and anathematized them.

Priests who belonged to the National Church, were in any case in excommunicated automatically in all senses.

Benedict XV. insisted in a letter of the 29th of January 1920, that there was never an agreement on priestly marriage.

The Czech Bishops had shown themselves equal to the situation -- and he was grateful for the decisive shepherds.

The Church's Censure Showed Itself as the Right Way


In an address at the end of the year in 1920, Pope Benedict XV stressed that Rome would not endeavor making the rule regarding celibacy any less stringent.

Any deviating assertions are misleading.

It is clear that the Church has priestly celibacy to thank for a great part of Her power.

It must be wholely and entirely unaltered.

That  is " never before has it been more necessary in these times of moral degredation and unchecked vice" -- said the Pope on the eve of National Socialism and Fascism.

It will never happen that "this Holy Apostolic See will enfeeble or abolish this most holy law of priestly celibacy in any manner."

Back then: The Church Oriented Itself on Reality


Cardinal Brandmuller praised Romes decisive proceedings against the Czech rebels:  "There was an understanding that set in that this was something that couldn't be won by negotiations."

The rebels wanted to alter the foundations of the Catholic Faith and of Christendom.

That was shown, among other things, in a popular census in 1921.

According to that 3.2 percent of Czechs belonged to the State sponsored Church.

The other part of Catholics -- about 76.3 percent of the population -- remained Catholic.

Today, the rebel society calls itself the 'Czech-Hussite Church'.

They count on paper around 100,000 demoralized members.

Link to kreuz.net....

Photo: © Che, Wikipedia, CC




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