Sunday, September 14, 2014

No Obligatory Memorial For John XXIII. and John Paul II.

Canonization of two popes
(Vatican) As reported , the Osservatore Romano published the decree of the Congregation for Divine Worship ,in its Friday edition with the liturgical observances for the two popes canonized in late April popes.  It is optional, not mandatory to observe.
The Church commemorates Pope John XXIII. on 11 October and Pope John Paul II. on 22 October. Both dates apply to the liturgical calendar of the new rite. The Saints were declared last April 27 by Pope Francis. The two popes belong with fifteen other popes along with the Prince of the Apostles, Peter, to the saints of the Catholic Church.

Observances of the Newly Sainted  Popes not Mandatory

While all of the canonized saints are recorded in the Roman Martyrology , not all are included in the  Calendarum Romanum  Generale. In the  Roman Calendar only those saints are included, whose remembrance apply because of their universal significance for the world Church. Thus the Church distinguishes between the "memoria obbligatoria", which is commanded, and the "memoria ad libitum", which is not commanded. For the saints of particular importance for the World Church the Roman calendar provides for mandatory festivals. The fest days for other saints may be included "at discretion" in a celebration, but should not be celebrated.

Pope Pius X Is the Only Pope of  the Second Millennium with With an Obligatory Feast

Since September 12, the Church has recognized seventeen popes, who are recognized in the General Roman Calendar, but only four of them possess an mandatory feast.  Three of the four are from the first Christian millennium: St. Gregory the Great (3 September), the Saint Cornelius (September 16, together with the Holy Cyprian), and the  Saint Leo the Great (November 10). Only one holy Pope, whose memory is binding on the universal Church, comes from the second Christian millennium, Saint Pius X (August 21).
The other canonized popes, including John XXIII. and John Paul II., have inclusion in the General Roman Calendar, but their memorials are   not binding. With the exception of the two thereto, and to two other popes, the saints of Gregory VII. (May 25), and Saint Pius V. (April 30), they all belong to the early Christian centuries.
They are Saint Fabian (20 January), the Saint Martin I. (13 April), St. John I. (May 18), Saint Sixtus II. (August 7), Saint Pontian (13th August, along with the antipope Hippolytus of Rome), the Saint Calixtus I. (Oct. 14), Saint Clement I. (November 23), the Saint Damasus I. (December 11), and the Saint Sylvester I ( December 31).
Text: Settimo Cielo / Giuseppe Nardi
image: Settimo Cielo / Traditio Catholica
Trans: Tancred vekron99@hotmail.com
AMDG

2 comments:

Anonymous said...

Optional, you know, sort of like a pastoral council is optional and an illicit, non promulgated mass is optional

LeonG said...

I shall totally forget both, thank you very much.

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